Bob the Cow

This is Bob. Say Hi to bob. He like salty things and standing in the sun. I like Bob. I actually met Bob on the farm while visiting a friend. However, believe me that Bob in real life was a lot more interesting, albeit not as colorful.

For this image, I sketched out my image lightly with pencil then continued to experiment using the Karin Brushmarker Pro watercolor markers. I mainly created a pool of ink then used a watercolor brush to the paper. The white highlights were a combination of a gel pen and white gesso.

Danielle Donaldson Creative Watercolor

I’ve been getting into watercolor and one of the books I came across was The Art of Creative Watercolor by Danielle Donaldson. She has a fun whimsical style that I like and thought that was a good place to dabble. One of the things she draws are wonky people she calls “Littles” so in this project, I picked out a few of my favorites to color. Some of these are altered or combined but mostly are mostly examples from the book.

Colored with GenCraft Brush Watercolor Markers on Strathmore Cold Press 140# paper.
This one was colored with Brea Reese Watercolor Creams on the same paper, of course.
This Little was colored with Karin Brushmarker Pro watercolor markers, with a direct to paper technique where I wet the paper then touched it with the marker and spread it around with a brush.
The Little on the left was also colored with Karin Brushmarker Pro watercolor markers but it was done with an indirect method – the ink was dispensed on a mixing tray first then picked up with the brush and applied to the paper. The Little on the right was done with the Winsor & Newton half pan watercolor 14-ct travel set.

Here’s the group of Littles all together. I went back in and fixed the blotch on the troll’s shirt then darkened the lines in some places, used a white gel pen and splattered colored water to finish. I didn’t enjoy working with the Brea Reese Watercolor Creams so I’ll skip those the next time. The rest are still on the table and I’ll try this again with another sheet of Littles.

Create A Scene – Forest

I’m using the DoveArt line of stamps Create A Scene Forest to put together a quick winter scene. Seeings how cold it is for me right now, I thought this would be fitting. The stamp was embossed in black then I used the Karin Brushmarker watercolor markers to color the background and some shadows.

The white snow was created with a Marvy Snow Marker then heat set to puff it up. The sentiment is a Make it Crafty chipboard embellishment colored with Copic Markers. The background layer of paper was also colored with Copic Markers.

You can find most of these products at Whimsy Stamps:

Stamp: Create a Scene – Forest
Sentiment: Make it Crafty Chipboard Elements

Out of This World

Here’s another galaxy background I tried out and this one uses Distress Inks and the round sponge. Thank you to Chrissy (Chrissyd723) for pointing me to the YouTube tutorial.  This technique was less frustrating than the watercolor but it was significantly more time consuming.  However, either one, I liked the results.

These are the Copic markers I used on Out of This World:
E30, 31, 37
YG17, 23
BG45, 11
Y35, 11
V20, 25
YR09, 12, Y32
R17, 46
C0, 3, 7
W7, 5, 2
BV23
This is a card idea by Chari Moss which is featured in the Lawn Fawn store gallery.

Zoe by Christa

This project makes use of the Colouring Long Hair in Fine Detail eBook by Make it Craft and the image featured in that is Zoe by Christa, a Saturated Canary image. Zoe has done a great job instructing and teaching how to color long hair in fine details – just like the title suggests – and more!  I colored this one with watercolors and tried something new.  It turned out better than I had hoped.  Watercolors always gives me problems because I tend to use too much water and then everything gets to be a mess. LOL

I also used some chipboard embellishments by MiC and this time colored it with Prismacolor Pencils.  The main butterfly is colored to resemble a Cattleheart butterfly and the blue ones are suppose to be Blue Morpho butterflies.  Then the tiny red ones were just colored red because I needed more red.  Using the Prismacolor Pencils on the chipboard alwasy comes out with a nice color tone.  I think the softer led helps with that.

Birthday Daisies

Gorgeous Flowers Blooming just for you!  Happy New Year! We hope you have had a wonderful time over the holidays and wish you an amazing 2015!

You should have arrived here from the incredible ZOE!
But if you get lost you can start at the beginning HERE.

 
Today we are excited to be sharing a new release of beautifully illustrated flower stamps from Make it Crafty. They are intricate and delicate with lots of detail and are the perfect choice for many occasions. These gorgeous new flowers are available in both digital and rubber and the rubber stamps also come with a hand written sentiment, which of course you could use between all the different flowers.

For my project I’ve used Birthday Daisies and created a page in my trading card journal.  I first started with distress inks and tried to go for a watercolor look.  However since my watercolor skills are about as good as my karate skills it went about as well as I expected.  So I dragged out my Prismacolor pencils to save the image.

Your next stop on the hop is the talented KAY!  
But if you get lost you can find the complete hop at Make it Crafty HERE.
Good luck!

Many Thanks

This is the first page in my travel journal, which is an old book titled “Poor Richard’s Almanac (Selections)” by Benjamin Franklin and printed around 1937-1940. It’s a small book and perfect for traveling… hence why I’ve been chilling in it while I travel. 🙂

This image is Many Thanks from Stampendous and is suited for the many thanks I’m sending out to Jane for helping me with watercolors! I stamped on the book directly with black ink and colored this one with watercolor tube paints. The paper is thicker than a normal book would be so it handled the water just fine. So far so good. 🙂 I hope to try a variety of things with the book but the best pay is to have fun.